The Porcupine Peace Plan: How NH independence could boost American security and stop Armageddon

New Hampshire should withdraw from the United States and its alliances and request a significant reduction in gun control within member states as a minimum condition of rejoining. Nations with significant gun control are too costly for us to help defend, and we’re closer to independence than you think.

"To fight and conquer in all your battles is not supreme excellence; supreme excellence consists in breaking the enemy’s resistance without fighting."

– Sun Tzu

On March 12, 2006 five U.S. soldiers violated, then murdered, 14-year-old Abeer Hamza in her home at Yusufiyah, Iraq. Then they covered up the killing by wiping out most of her family at taxpayer expense. 1

Fifteen years and four days later, several dozen U.S. policy enforcement officers stormed a quiet neighborhood in America’s Pleasantville: Keene, New Hampshire. After using a battering ram connected to an armored vehicle, they flew a drone through the window of a home studio housing the state’s top radio discussion show, Free Talk Live. Washington claimed that some of its libertarian hosts had been selling significant amounts of Bitcoin without government permission and filed charges of “unlicensed money transmission.” The imperial capitol is seeking life imprisonment for at least one of the arrestees, with no credible claim that he even victimized anyone. 2

Though different in a hundred ways, each of these Federal excesses exemplified the numberless grievances which have sparked a growing pushback against D.C. in the “Live Free or Die” state. Local activists and legislators reacted with the New Hampshire Independence Amendment, also known as CACR 32. This constitutional revision would allow all NH residents to vote in a 2022 referendum on whether the state will continue being governed by Washington.

New Hampshire already has a long history of example-setting. But by striving for independence - and a more humane world security protocol - its citizens may be able to do something better. With your help, and the careful placement of a new idea on the geopolitical board, maybe our tiny new nation could even stop a world war.

NH independence proponents make a simple case. The FedGov, they say, has bloated beyond the point where normal individuals can meaningfully oppose its atrocities with conventional civics. They point to the successes of Estonian and British independence movements as well as the global trend toward “smaller nations.” In 1900 there were roughly 60 countries in the world. Now there are about 200. Meanwhile, thanks to these and other national divorces, the harm-inflicting capacity of various empires is less than it would be if they were still full-sized. Successful independence drives in America, too, should have a limiting effect on U.S. warmongering in faraway places.

But what of, say, Chinese government warmongering outside * its​ * borders? Whatever cruelties the U.S. government may have imposed, the nations bordering China do seem to generally prefer alliance with Washington over alliance with Beijing; some rely on D.C. for their security more than they should.

One of the main criticisms of NH independence is that it could undermine U.S. defense capability or, more accurately, American capacity for carrying out the existing commitments to NATO and Taiwan. The latter is of special significance, and we’ll use it as the focus of this discussion. But the arguments here apply to every U.S. ally.

Critics argue that America is overextended, much as Britain was overextended in the 1939 era when it guaranteed Poland against the Nazis. In those days the perception was that London had only two available courses of action: Wage war on Germany or appease Hitler by abandoning Poland. Today people imagine that we face a similar unthinkable choice as China flexes its new powers against Taiwan. An invasion of the island could trigger these same two ruinous impulses against a great resurgent Power, this time with the likelihood it would escalate into nuclear war. Taiwan’s friends, the thinking goes, would either have to commit another Munich…or defend the quasi-nation by risking civilization. Wouldn’t a New Hampshire independence drive damage America’s ability to follow the second option to victory?

Actually, there is a third option which could prevent both the evils of “big war” and the abandonment of overseas promises. An independent New Hampshire, or prospect thereof, is one way to put that path on the table. Let’s call this option the “Porcupine Peace Plan” for now…in honor of a less-threatening but better-defended posture some of us envision for America’s alliances.

This plan rests upon the barely-discussed idea that there is a great, untapped defense capacity among all reasonably-prosperous peoples, especially in Taiwan. Unlike military buildup it is a power which, when exercised, saves tax dollars rather than spending them…increases freedoms rather than reducing them. It possesses little potential for starting wars of aggression but has a proven history of discouraging them. Nevertheless, this power is often suppressed by the rulers of vulnerable nations…even as some of them face invasion or treat nuclear first-strikes as a legitimate method of self-protection. 2b

This seemingly magical ability…is the power of armed, individual self-defense…weapons freedom for the private citizen. And it is a power that the government of Taiwan has systematically denied to its people, at grave risk to a nervous world. The island’s gun control laws are so strict that WorldPopulationReview.com lists the number of civilian firearms there at literally zero per 100 persons (the U.S. has 120). Historically, the relative gun freedom of America helped it win the Revolutionary War and limited its risk of invasion over the following centuries.2c

We must respect the wishes of Taiwanese regarding their internal laws. But Taipei should respect our wishes when it comes to whether we risk our lives for them over their willful self-emasculation. We currently are doing exactly that at their government’s request; every last American is potentially on Beijing’s target list.3 And Taipei has unnecessarily increased the chances for war with Beijing…by keeping its civilians disarmed.

This policy cannot help but cause Taiwan to be a far more attractive target for invasion than it would be if it had weapons freedom for the average citizen. The island’s well-meaning government has formidable armed forces, but there is no substitute for the “defense dispersal” and individual initiative which comes from civilian weaponry. Gun freedom, in 1940, made fascist-surrounded Switzerland impractical for Germany to invade. 4 Norway, by contrast, was heavily defended by the British Empire and nowhere near surrounded…but fell quickly when Hitler’s forces mounted an attack on “central points of failure.” 4b

Gun availability for the average person can solve only so many problems, but nations which acquire this freedom also acquire a ready-made, widely-dispersed guerilla arsenal ready for use against any occupier. It lets a tiny nation do what Sun Tzu suggested, and “be like water.” When added to Taiwan’s existing military deterrent…this “scary freedom” should be enough to prevent invasion indefinitely.

Skeptical? Then you tell us: How well has the U.S. “nuclear government” fared against Afghan riflemen? Why is Beijing so terrified of guns that it has enacted some of the world’s strictest prohibitions against civilian-owned weaponry? 4c

Thanks to Taipei, the mainland communists don’t have much of that to be terrified of in Taiwan. They don’t have to factor civie-guns much into their “invasion equation” as Hitler did when he abandoned his plan to attack Switzerland. Ending this citizen-disempowerment could be just enough to prevent the expected attack on Taiwan. And New Hampshire can gently make the case…either through government policy or constructive private action. Here are the suggested steps to get us there:

  1. The New Hampshire Independence Amendment must get a full and fair hearing by our State and Federal Relations committee and face the full legislature without substantial alteration. This will give NHexiters new clout to advance the Porcupine Peace Plan. In the unlikely event Independence obtains legislative super-majorities on this first try, it would then go before the people. If they vote “yes” then…​

  2. Neutral by default, the newly independent nation could begin negotiations on whether it will re-join the alliances it has just departed.

  3. The negotiators should request, as a minimal precondition for re-joining, that Taiwan and other countries take steps of their own choosing to undo the invasion-friendly types of laws we’ve outlined above. It would be on the Taiwanese themselves to figure out how they want to handle this…and on us to decide whether their reforms, if any, are sufficient to win us over as renewed allies. The more weapon freedom they can offer their people, the more we’d want to join.

  4. If Taipei can’t accept this suggestion, loyally and responsibly given, New Hampshire could simply remain neutral and is probably better off that way anyhow. As Switzerland and Costa Rica have proven, neutrality can be much safer than joining an alliance. But we will have kept faith with the beleaguered island.

Even if New Hampshire doesn’t get past step one in 2022, we should at least be able to put the gun-control-helps-invaders issue on the table. And the same weapon freedom concerns which apply to Taiwan…should apply toward * any * potential ally, even as new personal defenses begin to replace firearms. A cheaper and more humane way of looking at security…may start to set in.

Objections

A) Crime concerns. Taipei presumably keeps its people disarmed in an honest attempt to reduce violent crime and/or uprising. Probably there is a fear that relaxation of gun laws would cause these to increase. There are not many test cases of real gun freedom in first-world Asia; we Westerners can only tell our own tale. We know that the U.S. states with the least gun control also have the least crime. New Hampshire, for example, has virtually no gun laws of its own and the second-highest level of gun freedom in America. Perhaps because of this it also has the second-lowest crime rate, and there was no violent uprising here during the 2020 unrest. Meanwhile the District of Columbia has gun restrictions comparable to Taiwan’s, "some of the strongest gun violence prevention legislation in the nation."4d Perhaps because of this…it also has America’s highest rate of violent crime and two semi-violent protests since 2020 which partially penetrated White House and Capitol Building defenses respectively. 5

The statistics are not always so clear-cut in favor of gun freedom as a crime reducer…but they do not take into account the potential - much greater - violence of the wars which gun control enables.

B ) Gun incidents - More weapons could mean more accidents and suicides; people would need to get up to speed on firearm safety. For the sake of argument let’s assume it would also mean more crime. But let’s keep these challenges in context. Taipei’s gun control has helped create a situation where the U.S. Navy is prepping for a possibly civilization-ending fleet battle over Taiwan, projected to cost it more than 10,000 lives on the first day of full engagement. 5b

C) Disruption. The Porcupine Peace Plan could trigger more independence legislation or otherwise distract Beijing’s target governments at a time when they arguably need to focus on preventing/winning the hot/cold war. If we’re an unwelcome disruption, perhaps we can make up for it. Maybe we could trigger a larger volunteer effort to help Taiwan deter invasion, with her consent. The goal should be lawful, private weapon and ammo shipments to Taiwanese civilians. But perhaps medicines or other pre-positioned supplies are doable * now * on an individual basis. Stay tuned to
The Porcupine Peace Plan: How NH independence could boost American security and stop Armageddon
as we discuss or act on this further. How much do you want to bet we find other infuriating regulatory hurdles against helping the islanders…

Meanwhile, it should not be hard for New Hampshirites, thinking, acting, maybe even being​ outside the box, to do better for Taiwan than we have in the past. Last year we were just another tiny assimilated unit in the Pacific alliance…paying taxes to the fumbling U.S. torture state but giving little thought to our sister democracy on Formosa. There is plenty of room for improvement.

D) The next objection should come from *you.*​ Visit to the link above if you’d like to raise concerns publicly. You can also contact me there, or volunteer to help. This idea is potentially world-changing, but I’m just another de-platformed videographer; what I can do alone is very limited without you.

Ultimately, this idea is not competing with perfect. It’s competing with the existing, terrifying options which unimaginative bureaucracies have handed us: Appeasement and nuclear war. You don’t need much speed to win a race with turtles, but urgency is indicated. For Taiwan and an honorable world peace…time is probably running out.

Dave Ridley

NHexit.com

Sources:
1 Mahmudiyah rape and killings - Wikipedia

2 Claiming flight risk, judge orders Free Keene activist held until bitcoin money laundering trial

2b Risk of Nuclear War Over Taiwan in 1958 Said to Be Greater Than Publicly Known - The New York Times

2c The American Revolution against British Gun Control

3 No first use - Wikipedia

4 The Swiss and their Guns, by Kopel and D'Andrilli , Operation Tannenbaum - Wikipedia

4b World War II - The invasion of Norway | Britannica

4c Gun control in China - Wikipedia

4d Washington DC | Giffords

5 List of U.S. states and territories by violent crime rate - Wikipedia https://www.freedominthe50states.org/guns , https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Floyd_protests_in_Washington%2C_D.C.

5b Why War With China Will Get You Drafted - YouTube

1 Like

maybe you could do a big ol writeup like that woman’s book you keep mentioning
and then make your own book and self publish like Alu is doing

ok the draft is posted. Anyone see any errors before I start shopping it around to bigger outlets?

The article mentions the idea of an American volunteer effort aimed at lawfully sending weapons and ammo to Taiwanese civilians…so they can better deter invasion and world war. It does not mention that I have some experience along these lines (though not with weapons). From 1992 through 1995 I smuggled, then mailed, perhaps $30,000 worth of medical supplies into Bosnia and Croatia as my part in the war effort against a fascistic Serbian government. This was mostly a process of contacting medical facilities near me and asking them if they had anything they wanted to get rid of. I hit the jackpot with a Catholic Charities branch which usually had to throw away about 5 pounds of prescription medicines per month. This was a result of over-cautious expiration dates. The Balkan governments had wisely set up a loophole where docs could continue using such meds for another 6 months after expiry.

Anyway I wonder if I/we could do something along these lines in the South China Sea as a stopgap measure?

Another thought , for those of you thinking " all of this is going off-mission or none of our business…" The idea here is that if we are going to push for independence, we need to do it responsibly. That means swallowing Slovenian independence veteran Ana Stanic’s warning: You must start planning the details of independence early and prepare for the disruptions.

This is the disruption I’m best qualified to game out and help alleviate…the disruption to NATO and overseas peoples who genuinely, sometimes excessively, look to America as a lesser evil and as part of their defense. What is the disruption you are best qualified to work on?

Sent to gun club in New Taipei:

"Msg. for IDPA Taiwan: Can I help you defend your island?

Dear allies at IDPA Taiwan:

I’m an American gun rights activist who has recently published an article about gun control in Taiwan and the indirect danger these restrictions pose to my state, New Hampshire. Specifically the essay deals with the likelihood that Taipei’s gun laws have increased the risk of invasion, which of course could trigger a war that engulfs all of the U.S.:

However, having laid out these criticisms, I would nevertheless like to play a part in the defense of your island. I would prefer to ship weapons to Taiwanese civilians, but this is probably not lawful. Maybe it is possible to send humanitarian supplies. During the Bosnian war I had some success finding surplus medical goods and mailing them to a hospital in Zagreb. Your situation is different, but I assume that pre-positioning supplies is of some value. Do you have any advice for me or suggestions as to how or who I could help? I do not have much money, but I do have some time, some friends and the ability to spread information to a fairly large audience. Maybe we could start something constructive, something that is bigger than us.

Dave Ridley
NHexit.com
“Independence without Enmity” "